How Do You Wash A Ski Jacket? [Updated!]

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Taking your skis and snowboard off for summer is a huge commitment. The act of taking off your ski gear signals the end of the trail season and the beginning of a new season – it means you might not be wearing your favourite ski clothes anymore. Fortunately, you can keep your ski wear looking as good as new with a little care and attention. This article will tell you about some handy tips on how to wash your ski gear so you can get back out there as soon as possible.

Use The Right Detergents

Most skiers and snowboarders would agree that washing their ski gear is one of the most important steps towards having clean and dry equipment once winter is over. Using the wrong detergents or dirty water can cause damage that might require you to replace some parts. Throwing in a few drops of essential oils can boost the effectiveness of most detergents, so it’s worth experimenting with a few different options before you decide on what you want to use. Once you’ve found the perfect combination, you’ll wonder why you didn’t think of it earlier.

Rinse Items In Cold Water

There are many reasons why you should always rinse your ski gear in cold water instead of hot. First, hot water can strip the oils from your skin and hair, leaving you vulnerable to the elements. Second, cold water can help maintain the shape of your gear as you wash it, which is why most ski shops don’t provide heat in their water dispensers. Finally, rinsing your equipment in cold water can prevent the growth of bacteria and fungus that can cause your skis and snowboard to deteriorate quickly.

Even when you’re not actively skiing, the elements can still cause damage to your equipment. The wind can whip around in any direction and dry out your ski equipment quickly whether you’re on snow or just off-trail on a balmy day. Sunlight can cause discoloration and damage to your apparel and ski gear, so it’s always wise to take extra care of your gear when the weather is good. After all, we wouldn’t want any grey hair now, would we?

Use The Right Cleaning Rags

Washing your ski gear with a dry rag can help remove most of the water that has come in contact with it, but it isn’t a one-stop solution. Even though most of the water has been removed, it still leaves a thin layer on your equipment that might not be removed by just rinsing it in cold water. If you notice, most ski shops offer cleaning cloths in addition to or instead of rags, so you can be sure that your gear is fully dried before storing it. Dry rags can also be harmed by the high temperatures that some detergents can produce, so it’s best to use a clean towel whenever possible.

Dry rags are also easy to replace, and you’ll find many different styles and sizes at most ski shops, so you’re sure to find one that will fit you perfectly. It’s also a good idea to purchase a pack of dry rags that is large enough to last you the whole season. You never know when you might need a patch job, so having a large supply handy is the best protection against the unexpected.

Don’t Store Your Equipment In The Sun

You might be tempted to bring some of your gear along when you travel, but don’t do it! Storing your skis and snowboard outside in the direct sunlight can cause damage that might require you to spend more money than you’d like to spend on repairs. If you must travel with your gear, store it in a cool, dark place that is as dry as possible. If you get a spot of moisture on any of your equipment, it might rot and deteriorate quickly, causing you more problems down the line.

Avoid Using Teflon Pads

Teflon pads are another dangerous additive you might find in some detergents. While the non-stick properties of Teflon make it an ideal choice for some types of cleaners, it’s not the best choice for washing your ski gear. The slick surface of Teflon can accelerate the wear and tear on your skis and snowboard, causing you to spend more money on repairs than you’d like to. If you must wash your gear, use dishwashing soap instead of cleaning products that contain Teflon.

Throwing in a few drops of essential oils can boost the effectiveness of most detergents, so it’s worth experimenting with a few different options before you decide on what you want to use. Once you’ve found the perfect combination, you’ll wonder why you didn’t think of it earlier.

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